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Horny goat weed (Epimedium grandiflorum)



Interactions

Horny goat weed/Drug Interactions:
  • Anticoagulant/antiplatelet medicationsAnticoagulant/antiplatelet medications: Epimedium may have anticoagulant effects.
  • Antihyperlipidemia agentsAntihyperlipidemia agents: Horny goat weed may lower cholesterol.
  • Antihypertensive agentsAntihypertensive agents: Epimedium may have hypotensive effects.
  • EstrogenEstrogen: Horny goat weed may increase estrogen activity (13; 14; 15; 16; 17).
  • Immunostimulating/immunosuppressing agentsImmunostimulating/immunosuppressing agents: Based on an animal study, the plant flavonoid baohuoside-1 (B-1), isolated from Epimedium davidii, may suppress antibody and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses (9).
  • InterleukinsInterleukins: Horny goat weed may increase interleukin IL-2, IL-3, and IL-2 receptors. Based on human studies, horny goat weed may inhibit IL-6 (10).
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs): Based on an animal study, Epimedium brevicorum may inhibit the activity of monoamine oxidase in the hypothalamus (18).
  • Oral contraceptionOral contraception: Horny goat weed may increase estrogen activity (13; 14; 15; 16; 17).
  • Thyroid agentsThyroid agents: Based on animal studies, prolonged use of excessive amounts of horny goat weed may be associated with decreased thyroid activity and T3, and increased rT3 and TRH (12).

Horny goat weed/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Anticoagulant/antiplatelet herbs and supplementsAnticoagulant/antiplatelet herbs and supplements: Epimedium may have anticoagulant effects.
  • Antihyperlipidemia agentsAntihyperlipidemia agents: Horny goat weed may lower cholesterol.
  • Antihypertensive agentsAntihypertensive agents: Epimedium may have hypotensive effects.
  • Estrogenic herbsEstrogenic herbs: Horny goat weed may increase estrogen activity (13; 14; 15; 16; 17).
  • Immunostimulating/immunosuppressant agentsImmunostimulating/immunosuppressant agents: Based on an animal study, the plant flavonoid baohuoside-1 (B-1), isolated from Epimedium davidii, may suppress antibody and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses (9).
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs): Based on an animal study, Epimedium brevicorum may inhibit the activity of monoamine oxidase in the hypothalamus (18).
  • Thyroid agentsThyroid agents: Based on animal studies, prolonged use of excessive amounts of horny goat weed may be associated with decreased thyroid activity and T3, and increased rT3 and TRH (12).

Horny goat weed/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Horny goat weed/Lab Interactions:
  • 17-ketosteroids17-ketosteroids: Use of horny goat weed may increase urinary 17-ketosteroids.
  • BUNBUN: Based on an animal study, Epimedium sagittatum may decrease the level of blood urea nitrogen (19).
  • CholesterolCholesterol: Horny goat weed may lower cholesterol.
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Epimedium may have anticoagulant effects.
  • CreatinineCreatinine: Based on an animal study, Epimedium sagittatum may decrease the level of serum creatinine (19).
  • Estrogen levelsEstrogen levels: Horny goat weed may increase estrogen activity (13; 14; 15; 16; 17).
  • HomocysteineHomocysteine: Horny goat weed may increase or decrease homocysteine levels (11).
  • InterleukinsInterleukins: Horny goat weed may increase interleukin IL-2, IL-3, and IL-2 receptors. Based on human studies, horny goat weed may inhibit IL-6 (10).
  • Testosterone levelsTestosterone levels: Horny goat weed may increase testosterone activity (13; 14; 15; 16; 17).
  • Thyroid activityThyroid activity: Based on animal studies, prolonged use of excessive amounts of horny goat weed may be associated with decreased thyroid activity and T3, and increased rT3 and TRH (12).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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